The Writer’s Dashboard

The 10 Most Memorable Book Titles of Last Week

Greetings from the Curation Team at Find My Audience! 

We have decided to write weekly blog posts that will reflect upon our experiences curating information about books, authors, blogs, and bloggers. You can expect to see us cover a wide variety of topics, ranging anywhere from posts like The 10 Most Memorable Book Titles of Last Week to posts about The Authors We Want to Hang Out With. Today we are focused on the former (but don’t worry, the latter is on its way).

We try not to judge a book by its cover, but it’s hard not to judge it by its title. We chose the following list of 10 most memorable book titles because they caught our attention and stayed on our minds last week. Some are funny, some are sad, and some are just flat out strange. We hope you enjoy them as much as we did!

What were the 10 most memorable book titles we curated last week? 

Have a lovely week!

Sincerely,

The FMA Curation Team

At Find My Audience, we understand that not all authors are marketers. That being said, growing your social audience can expand your readership and book sales. You don’t have to be a book marketer to find new readers online. We are here to simplify this process for you. Sign up today and connect with potential readers across the globe.

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Pinterest for Authors

Every morning I spend a few hours collecting content to share on the Find My Audience social media platforms. I look for trends in the publishing industry and I pay special attention to the articles that describe how things are changing for writers (and readers, for that matter).

The publishing industry is always evolving and it adapts with the times—and fast! That said, in today’s age an author’s success is dependent on his or her ability to hit a moving target. Authors are left wondering, “What can I do to keep up?”

One thing the experts do agree on is the need for authors to focus on building a strong social media presence—right now. The social web is where things are happening for authors these days; and it makes sense, considering that’s where their readers spend their time.

One of the best social media platforms for reaching readers and sharing content on the web is Pinterest. You can use it as a tool to introduce yourself, engage with your audience, and drive traffic to your various websites.

What is Pinterest?
Jon Reed describes Pinterest as “a virtual corkboard – a place to pin your interests. You create and arrange boards on specific topics and pin images and other media such as video to them.” In essence, Pinterest is a referral engine that is filled with customer insight intelligence. Seth Fiegerman adds to the conversation in his article explaining why, “Pinterest Drives More Traffic to Publishers Than Twitter, LinkedIn, and Reddit Combined.” He says that, “When it comes to referral traffic from social networks, there’s Facebook and Pinterest—and then there’s everyone else.” Instead of having to ask people what they like, they tell you by pinning it.

Why is Pinterest a useful tool for authors?
It gives you the opportunity to share your content and your books with your current audience, as well as many potential prospects. As long as you have a visual representation of the work you have done – book covers, book trailers, illustrations from your novel, fan art, or even a headshot – you can pin links to your work, driving traffic to your website(s). Because referral marketing is so powerful in the publishing industry, it’s no wonder why successful authors are starting to use Pinterest. It screams book marketing!

Authors who are on Pinterest already?
Take a look at some of these Young Adults authors who already have accounts on Pinterest:

Lisa Shafer (Confessions of an Average Half-Vampire): http://pinterest.com/lisawriting/
Laura Thomas (Tears To Dancing)http://pinterest.com/lauracthomas/
Todd R. Tystad (Blue Hill): http://pinterest.com/toddrtystad
Sara Zarr (Story of a Girl, How to Save a Life, etc.): http://pinterest.com/sarazarr
Amie Kaufman (Wrecked): http://pinterest.com/amiekaufman
Lynne Kelly (Chained): http://pinterest.com/lynnekellyh
Caitlin Kittredge (The Iron Codex series, etc): http://pinterest.com/caitkitt/

So how do you get started?

  • Sign up. You have the option to log in using your email, Facebook or Twitter account. I recommend connecting with one of your existing social media accounts because it will be significantly easier for you to find your friends, family members, and favorite public figures or blogs to follow.
  • Create your profile. You get to choose a username for your account. Keep it consistent with your other social media usernames. That’ll make it easier for your fans and potential followers to find you.
  • Check your settings. Turn your email notifications on. You want to know who is pinning what, and overtime you’ll start to understand the “why” behind their behavior. Having access to the “whom”, “what”, and “why” is important.

How do you pin?

  • Install the Pin It Button. With the Pin It button on your browser, you can easily pin any of the content you have on your page.
  • Add a Pin. When you are browsing the web and you want to add a pin, you can click the Pin It button on your bookmark bar or on the website you are pinning from. Then, Pinterest will give you the option to select which board you’d like to pin it to.
  • Create a New Board. Everything you pin is added to a board you have created. You can do so by clicking the “Add +” button in the upper right-hand corner of your main Pinterest page. Select the option to Create a Board. You can name your boards anything you’d like–but try to be specific, so that when potential users search for pins or boards similar to your board, it will show up in their search results.
  • Repin from Your Feed. You are able to see what your followers are pinning as well. In order to repin their post, all you have to do is run your mouse over the pin and select the “Pin It” button. It’ll direct you to the board you’d like to pin it to.
  • Like and Comment. Engage with your Pinterest community! Like pins; comment on pins; get to know your followers and let them get to know you.

Sources used for the above information:

–Alexa Davis

At Find My Audience, we understand that not all authors are marketers. That being said, growing your social audience can expand your readership and book sales. You don’t have to be a book marketer to find new readers online. We are here to simplify this process for you. Sign up today and connect with potential readers across the globe.

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Getting The Most Out Of Google+

Since its beginning, Google+ has been a phenomenal writing community and resource. As a writer, you can find plenty of support, information, and feedback from people every step of the way throughout your writing process. Plus, there is an underutilized promotional tip that can bring attention to your book events. Some of the tips listed below will help you make the most out of your Google+ experience.

To forewarn those of you who aren’t familiar with Google+, this post is designed for those who have some experience with the social media site, but feel as if you just don’t “get it” or you haven’t unlocked all of its features yet. So, let’s get started!

1) Don’t forget to follow and engage.

 google_one

Much like Twitter, it’s easier than you might think to find other writers on Google+. Simply search for terms such such as “writing,” “writer,” or “author” and you will uncover a slew of fellow writers and authors on the social network.

Circling people is meaningless, though, if you don’t spend a little time engaging with their content by sharing, “plusing,” or commenting. With Google+, comments and interaction are much more meaningful than on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest, where it’s easy to get lost in the shuffle.

2) Utilize Communities

 google_two

The communities feature of Google+ is a wonderful resource for writers. Communities such as Blogger Coffee Shop and Speculative Fiction Writers allow one to ask questions about the writing process and gain support. I have also seen people ask questions about self-publishing, book covers, and everything else in between. Google+ Communities are the new hub of writing communities. You can find any group of writers you need for your niche.

3) Create events for book promotional dates, tours, etc.

google_three 

I utilized events recently when I launched a Twitter Party event for an author with a new book coming out. It was the first time I had used this feature, and I was nervous about sending this event request to so many people I followed. The results? All positive. I received a lot of supportive remarks and a lot of people RSVP’d.

If you haven’t used this feature before, I highly recommend it. It is very useful for book launch events or tours. Use it wisely, though, as it gets sent out to everyone you’ve selected to send it out to (I sent it to over 5,000 people I followed) and you don’t want to be flagged as nuisance. So, make sure you are sending this to other writers and bookworms who will appreciate this event.

4) Create smaller circles of more engaged people to be able to send out niche specific posts.

google_four 

One of the beneficial, but more “housework-related” features of Google+ is the ability to create smaller circles of people with whom you share your posts. I’ve clumped people into one or two categories of “following” or “writing” people. However, if you have a variety of people you share content with, some posts may cater to a specific crowd. With Google+, it’s very easy to build a circle of people who only receive certain kinds of posts.

5) Complete your profile and be active.

One deterrent to circling someone back is an incomplete profile. If someone doesn’t have a photo and they have shared nothing about themselves and have never shared anything on Google+, more than likely I will not follow them back.

Make an effort to have a photo of yourself on your profile and share a little bit about yourself. Better yet, make sure in your tag line you describe yourself as a writer. Many people search for people to follow based on various search terms that interest them, so if you want to gain the attention of other writers on Google+, use words like author or writer in your profile.

6) Don’t be overwhelmed by number of followers.

Last, but not least, what I’ve noticed about Google+ is just because you have a high number of people who have circled you back, doesn’t mean that you have a lot of engaged people reading your content. Indeed, if you have a core group of people who are engaged and share your content, then you are way ahead of the game. Don’t get bogged down by the goal of having more than 1,000 people who have circled you back. If you have 100 who have circled a comment, or given a plus one, or share your posts and interact with you, then you don’t have anything to worry about.

What I like best about Google+ is that it does engage writers. You can use more words in your posts and you can seek refuge in the community area to gain support. Whether you have just signed up or you have been with Google+ for a long period, it’s always possible to enhance your experience and make it the best social network you use. There’s a whole world of writers on GooglePlus. So don’t miss out.

About the Author
Nicole Pyles is a writer and blogger living in the Pacific Northwest. In her free time, she loves to read and write about things that go bump in the night. She enjoys helping authors unlock their potential with social media and recently started hosting Twitter parties for the book promotional service Pump Up Your Book. Read her blog at World of My Imagination and follow her on Twitter and, of course, GooglePlus.

At Find My Audience, we understand that not all authors are marketers. That being said, growing your social audience can expand your readership and book sales. You don’t have to be a book marketer to find new readers online. We are here to simplify this process for you. Sign up today and connect with potential readers across the globe.

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Beginnings

A number of years ago I wrote The Book of Margery Kempe. I was inspired to write the novel by Edward Nolan, a professor of literature at the University of Colorado at Boulder. I was developing a CD-ROM on the history of the humanities and had hired Ed to write the section on the Middle Ages. One script, on the outspoken medieval pilgrim, Margery Kempe, fascinated me. Ed portrayed her as a character right out of Faulkner — except, of course, that she was English and lived in the fifteenth century. Regardless, I’m a big fan of strong women, and of pilgrimages, and for years Margery roiled about in my head until, finally, she walked out of it and onto the page. I hope I did her justice.

Like many of you, I self-published my novel. I couldn’t bear the thought of having to pitch a literary agent, assuming I even got one to respond to a query letter. I’m an entrepreneur and I’m used to asking people for money to build software but to have to do the “song and dance” for an agent didn’t sit well with me. The act of writing is such a personal process, such an act of self-discovery, that I didn’t want my hypothetical “market value” to determine my own self worth. Call me thin-skinned, but I decided to pass on that evaluation.

magaphone

So I jumped into the self-marketing game — started a blog, then added Twitter and LinkedIn accounts. I figured Facebook and Pinterest would come down the road once I got my “author platform” humming. I started blogging away and following other writers. And I worked those channels hard but it quickly became apparent to me that there was a lot of “noise” out of there — and it was time-consuming work, to boot! When I did hawk my book, what Jane Freidman calls “bullhorning,” it was unclear to me who was seeing the message or if the message was working — there just didn’t seem to be a good way to find and quantify which folks would be more “predisposed” to like my book. From that experience was borne Find My Audience, which is dedicated to finding a writer’s audience on the social web. And doing it quickly, so writers can have more time for — writing!

More than a year later we are in the final stages of preparing the Find My Audience application for Beta, which we will deliver to the market in June. We are having our first users test the application now. They provide us with feedback, we incorporate their suggestions, and then we release another version of the application — and so on, until we feel the application is ready for prime time. We’d love to have you join in the process. Take a look at the brief video of what we are doing at www.findmyaudience. If you like what you see, sign up for it here. Thanks for your support!

- Mark Schroeder

At Find My Audience, we understand that not all authors are marketers. That being said, growing your social audience can expand your readership and book sales. You don’t have to be a book marketer to find new readers online. We are here to simplify this process for you. Sign up today and connect with potential readers across the globe.

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Metatagging, Genetic Analysis and Audience Discovery

In a recent blog post, Mike Shatzkin of the Logical Marketing Agency talks about the importance of understanding the potential audience for a book, as a crucial complement to metatagging (generating descriptive metadata that would allow a work to show up at appropriate places in search and recommendation engines.)

As the co-founder of a company called Find My Audience, I agree with Shatkin’s general point; indeed, I said something very similar in my blog post last week. But I disagree with several contentions that seem to inform his view.

The first thing I disagree with is his pooh-poohing of the type of structural, or genetic, deconstruction that companies like Trajectory are doing to help literary distributors or buyers find books they might like.

Towards the end of his post, he states bluntly: “If what you want is to make your book pop in the searches of likely readers … finding a book that is similar in writing style, pacing, and story construction really won’t help you at all.”

Really? It seems odd to me to dismiss the rather obvious notion that if I like one book, I might like a book that is similar to it in some way.

Sure, this can be done crudely … I happen to love Thomas Pynchon but have never taken a shine to the writing of Don Delillo, with whom he is often compared in theme, mood, voice and style.

But why shouldn’t we try to build and extend our understanding of how certain books work, and relate them to similar works, in the hopes that readers might find some guidance venturing into their next reading experience?

This work is still in its infancy, but where I see it going is that we will be able to describe writings in greater detail relative to the great literary critical frameworks of the last century:

  • Northrop Frye’s archetypal types and modes (tragedy, comedy, thematic; mythic, romantic, ironic).
  • Gerard Genette’s syntax of narratives (Order, Frequency, Duration, Voice and Mode)
  • E.M. Forster’s Aspects of the Novel (story, characters, plot, fantasy, prophecy, pattern, rhythm)
  • Wittgenstein’s theories of language games.

I think it will be amazing when we can go way beyond “keywording” to teasing out (with more or less help from humans) many of the generic, genetic and genealogical structures operating in a work and sending readers to interesting nearby lands. I believe the work Trajectory is doing (and Booklamp and Small Demons before them) is just the beginning.

The second place I disagree with Shatzkin is more a matter of emphasis. As I mentioned, I share his belief that audience research is a key component of book marketing. As he puts it, it is a “separate task that can take a couple of hours or more and requires a dedicated effort.”

But I believe he goes on to overstate what it takes to do this: “The research exercise we’re suggesting is a prerequisite doesn’t just take time: it takes knowledge and skill, as does applying what is learned to the copy. Even if the knowledge were there and distributed across all the people who write descriptive copy today — and there is no publisher on the planet in which it is — the time required for the research would tax the resources of any house.”

The proposition here is that understanding the audience for a work is the “core activity” for book marketing, that undue attention on genetic deconstruction is “distracting,” and that the core activity is best done by a professional digital marketer.

We say: not so fast. Digital platforms like Trajectory are getting better at understanding key effective structural elements of books, social listening platforms are already being used to understand sentiment and affinity trends, and platforms like Find My Audience are getting better at finding and understanding readers based on their expressed (and implied) interests and affinities.

There will undoubtedly be a role for professional book marketers for many years to come. We are in an age of constant evolution and disruption, and there will not be a monolithic platform for how books are marketed. Our interest is in developing tools that help writers first and foremost, as well as professional book marketers, agencies, and publisher-press marketing departments.

Algorithms and Big Social platforms that bake in smart and sensitive understanding of literary and semantic models will be a key part of the mix.

-Paul Agostinelli

At Find My Audience, we understand that not all authors are marketers. That being said, growing your social audience can expand your readership and book sales. You don’t have to be a book marketer to find new readers online. We are here to simplify this process for you. Sign up today and connect with potential readers across the globe.

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First Principles

From the first day at Find My Audience (FMA) — an Indian lunch amongst our four co-founders in downtown Boulder — our driving purpose has been to put data, technology and social networks to work helping writers find readers. Although we quickly saw the potential of an “audience search engine” for other Creatives, and even small businesses, our focus has remained on writers, because that is who we are, and what we love.

As I watch the rapid evolution of all aspects of the publishing and blogging worlds, two principles continue to drive our vision:

  • Audience Discovery is a critical complement to Content Discovery.
  • An Audience is not the same as a market, a reader is not the same as a consumer, a writer is not a merchandiser, and writing is not best treated as a commodity.

I’d like to say a little more about these principles, because they are not self-evident.

Audience Discovery is a Critical Complement to Content Discovery

Right now, most of the really smart thinking about digital marketing of writing is being applied to “content discovery.” That means creating a digital profile of your work (using metatags, etc.) that causes it to appear in search results, recommendation engines, relevant social conversations, and potentially paid advertising channels.

As I read various online conversations about book marketing, I see advice on enhancing discoverability crop up EVERY DAY. It appears in self-publishing discussion groups, publishing industry trade articles, and in the services of professional book marketers. (That last link goes to Peter McCarthy and Mike Shatzkin’s Logical Marketing Agency, which does much more than SEO optimization.)

As a writer, improving your content discoverability is essential. However, two things make it a less than ideal way for writers to find readers:

  1. It requires a writer to think like a search engine. When you are improving your discoverability, you are prettying yourself up for a machine.
  2. It is passive. Once you metatag your work, you sit back and hope readers find you via the aforementioned algorithm-driven systems.

Audience Discovery is a critical complement to Content Discoverability because it turns the tables on these two factors. With Find My Audience, writers talk about their work in terms of specific interests and similar works, that is, in terms of what a potential reader (not a search engine) is interested in. And when an Audience is returned, the author can reach out and engage directly with people, communities, groups and conversations, extending the voice they have created in their work.

Some may contend that writers are not marketers and don’t want to do “active promotion,” but I disagree. Not only is it the way of the world these days, but writers are temperamentally disposed to talk about their writing; it is their passion!

The problem is when marketing tools are too difficult to use or appear to create spam. A writer never wants to come across as a shrill self-promoter.

We feel we are building a platform that puts the power of active engagement into the hands of writers, and based on responses so far, many writers agree.

I’ll talk about our second principle in a future blog post. As I just mentioned, I do believe that writers are actually well-positioned to be self-marketers, when the tools and context of their outreach are consistent with the usual skills and attributes of a writer. I DON’T believe that writers are well-positioned to be merchandisers, who are typically focused on engineering various environments to maximize sales for a commodity product.

Sorry…a book (or blog, or magazine, or newspaper) is not JUST a commodity, and writers don’t ONLY want sales.

Of course, they are, and they do…just not exclusively.

All right, it’s back to getting our alpha ready…keep writing, and I’ll talk back at you soon!

–Paul Agostinelli

At Find My Audience, we understand that not all authors are marketers. That being said, growing your social audience can expand your readership and book sales. You don’t have to be a book marketer to find new readers online. We are here to simplify this process for you. Sign up today and connect with potential readers across the globe.

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Think You Don’t Need a Writing Coach? Think Again.

Writers are idea people. Big picture people. We are the visionaries who weave dozens of diverse colorful threads of narrative together to create one unified story. Writing is the thing we feel born to do and the thing no one could ever take away from us. It is our true purpose in life, whether it brings us euphoria or pain. Because we push on with it no matter what, the actual writing is never the problem.

It’s all the stuff that comes along with it, that is.

And that’s where a writing coach comes in.

Every writer I work with struggles with the same issues. They have a brilliant idea but can’t seem to finish writing the book it inspired. Or they finish but then feel lost on how to handle the revisions. They want to grow their writing career but they could use help with social media and getting reviews. They feel overwhelmed in this brave new world of publishing where a writer’s name depends on forging a unique identity, and they have no idea how to go about doing just that.

A top-notch writing coach helps with all this and more by:

Working with Writers to Release Inner Blocks
Many creative people unknowingly hold themselves back and self-sabotage out of fear. By honing in on who you are and how you psychologically tick, we can start to dissolve layers of resistance and open up the mental space needed for a writer to do their best work.

Getting Writers on a Realistic Writing Schedule
We set appointments for writing time and hold writers accountable for showing up. By committing to a regular schedule of time slots and word counts, even the slowest writers will see the pages increase week by week.

Being the First and Best Reader for a Writer’s Work
A top-notch writing coach also boasts the skills of a professional-grade editor and unfailingly supportive beta reader. If you don’t know the difference between the two, this is yet another thing a great writing coach can teach you.

Navigating Writers into Community, Career, and Claiming the Writer Identity
Writing groups, writers’ conferences, writing blogs—trying to get a handle on which is for you is confusing and exhausting. Writing coaches help writers find alignment with other writers, as well as the writing community that is truly a perfect fit.

If you feel scared and unsure about your writing, we can help. If you want to take the first draft of your manuscript to the next level, we can help. If you want to become the writer you always dreamed you could be, we can help.

All you have to do is ask.

About The Author
Lauren Sapala is a fiction writer, writing coach, and blogger. She founded the Write City writing group in San Francisco, and its sister branch in Seattle. She coaches all levels of writers, helping them to discover their voices and realize their goals and dreams.  Lauren currently lives in San Francisco and is working on her fifth novel. She blogs regularly at www.laurensapala.com.

At Find My Audience, we understand that not all authors are marketers. That being said, growing your social audience can expand your readership and book sales. You don’t have to be a book marketer to find new readers online. We are here to simplify this process for you. Sign up today and connect with potential readers across the globe.

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Why Similarities Are Important In Book Marketing

We’re new to the publishing industry and so we have been, for the last year or more, eagerly devouring articles from industry notables in an attempt to “school” ourselves in the language and practice of publishing. We have, in particular, learned quite a bit from Peter McCarthy and Mike Shatzkin, founders of Logical Marketing. Their posts have not only enlightened us but have reassured us that we are heading down the right road in the development of our Audience Management Platform for Writers.

A recent presentation by McCarthy entitled The Big Ideas in Big (or Small) Marketing Data reinforced for us the critical role that “similarities” play in book marketing. The sweet spot, as McCarthy notes, is to use similarities to find the audience that is “unaware [of my book] and just might [buy)” it. These adjacent  or “look-alike” audiences are comprised of people who are similar to our own followers or to a specific profile. They share the same demographic characteristics, use the same hashtags, etc. They may, in fact, like the same books.

Set of Black and White Feather.

We have trod down the same path as McCarthy in searching for those look-alike audiences – though we may use different terms and perhaps have received different inspiration for doing so. We are inspired by the philosopher Wittgenstein’s meditations on how “language” means (through “family resemblances”) and also from the linguist de Saussure, who posited that language was comprised of similarities and differences between words or signs.

This is not a leap, of course, for most writers – or readers. Amazon, Netflix and other companies have fashioned their recommendation engines so that we are constantly reading or viewing or listening to “similar” things (fortunately we can be a fan of many genres!). And many social media users are experts at finding similar hashtags through the use of www.hashtagify.me and other tools.

So we have been, instinctively, using similarities (or analogies) all along in our search for an audience (and for meaning in general). And this makes sense – as Douglas Hofstadter writes in Surfaces and Essences, “analogy is the fuel and fire of thinking.” It also drives what we are doing at Find My Audience. We are trying to automate that process, however. Take, for example, the screen presented below.

 

__FMA_PROFILE_01b_

 

This is our Profile Screen. Here we ask writers to tell us what genre(s) their book fits into, similar books, and keywords or phrases that might describe their book. Later on, the writer will be able to provide a fuller profile, but for now, these inputs are sufficient. We use those inputs to search the social web not only for matches but for similarities to the inputs the writer entered. Below is a sample screen return from our search of Twitter.

 

fma-audience-twitter-people

 

Note that our application returns users who have been “ranked” as being potentially predisposed based on the language they are using. We then enable you to communicate directly with that user. By narrowing down the audience, we save the writer time and we provide a direct-to-consumer marketing vehicle.

There are a lot of neat feat features in our Audience Management Application and in the weeks to come we will start to share them with you. In the meantime, should you want to be on our beta list of users, send us an e-mail at mark@findmyaudience.com.

At Find My Audience, we understand that not all authors are marketers. That being said, growing your social audience can expand your readership and book sales. You don’t have to be a book marketer to find new readers online. We are here to simplify this process for you. Sign up today and connect with potential readers across the globe.

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Photo Of The Day

doubleThis is why we live, work, play, and write – in Boulder!

 At Find My Audience, we understand that not all authors are marketers. That being said, growing your social audience can expand your readership and book sales. You don’t have to be a book marketer to find new readers online. We are here to simplify this process for you. Sign up today and connect with potential readers across the globe.

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By |August 28th, 2014|The Writer's Dashboard|1 Comment

Writers, Here’s What’s Coming!

Rock concert

It’s hard to believe, but the team at Find My Audience is only three to four weeks away from completing the Alpha stage of our Audience Management Platform for writers.

Okay, what is an Audience Management Platform? Quite simply, it is a software platform that will enable writers to search the social web for potential readers – in just seconds – and then communicate with those  readers in a more sophisticated fashion than is currently available. Really.

Our software was borne out of our own frustration at trying to market our writing on the social web. We discovered that the noise-to-signal ratio was daunting — we never knew whether our tweets and posts were getting read by the right people. We figured there had to be a better way.

And there is.

Logical Marketing (founded by publishing industry veterans Peter McCarthy and Mike Shatzkin), for example, offers a wonderful service to help writers get discovered on the web. Their “foundational” approach focuses on the upfront metatagging and SEO so that an author’s work  can be “discovered” by someone searching for a particular type of title. This is an enormously valuable service.

Our approach, while complementary, is different: an analogy for our software would be the Bloomberg Terminal, a computer system that enables financiers to monitor and analyze real-time market data. Our Audience Management platform is constantly searching the web for people who may be interested in your title. It is a direct-to-consumer strategy. It works while you sleep.

 

audience-people-tiles-filters-top

Now of course we are only arriving at Alpha – which means we are still at the crawling phase. There will be bugs. The algorithm will need improvement. The user interface will need adjusting. But the early results are promising. If you would like to get a sneak preview of what we are doing, we would be happy to do a virtual demo for you. Give us a  shout!

At Find My Audience, we understand that not all authors are marketers. That being said, growing your social audience can expand your readership and book sales. You don’t have to be a book marketer to find new readers online. We are here to simplify this process for you. Sign up today and connect with potential readers across the globe.

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