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Magical Realism Realized

cortazar_1The Simon Bolivar of the Novel: Julio Cortazar

I received a text today. Or maybe it was yesterday. I can’t be sure…

It was from my youngest daughter, who was attending the Buenos Aires Book Fair. She couldn’t pass up the chance of sending me a photo of Buenos Aires’s own great writer, Julio Cortazar, author (most notably) of Hopscotch, amongst other works. A handsome fellow, that Cortazar, and with that cigarette hanging from his mouth, he reminds me of Camus  (famous picture of whom below) – and there are other similarities, too (the fight against oppression, the fascination with memory, etc.).

camusSmoking Never Looked So Good

***

I believe that for my daughter Buenos Aires may have a tenuous, albeit unconscious, connection to another city she experienced as a  young girl, a city where the older people carry within them secrets and painful memories, where they walk in a similar manner, still cast furtive glances when out on the streets (J’accuse!).  A city where they give books and roses to a loved one once a year. Barcelona, that is. Like Buenos Aires,  a stylish city, yet one full of ghosts, one that still bears the pall of dictatorship.

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Are books always the great foe of dictatorships? Is imagination our last refuge? The only place we can be free?

***

Buenos Aires has been on my mind a lot lately…

Whilst wandering the streets of San Telmo, Buenos Aires’s well-known historic barrio, I was struck by the presentness of its past - different epochs meld into each other, historical figures have a life, are tangible on a daily basis (the Perons, for example – and Evita’s visage is prominently displayed on buildings).

One can see a Porsche plying its way through the streets followed by a horse-drawn cart. On one side of Plazza Dorrego couples will dance the tango, a mating ritual seemingly as old as time – and on the other, kids will be playing techno pop, banging drums. It all works, like some fabulous Magritte painting. Garcia Marquez said of Mexico that “surrealism runs through the streets.” The same can be said of Buenos Aires.

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***

At night the streets of San Telmo are crowded with los cartneros searching through the  garbage bins for recyclables Not one or two, mind you. There are families. Gangs. Running mates. Solitaries. People pushing carts. When the sun comes up, they disappear.

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I barely know Buenos Aires, but like Cortazar’s Hopscotch, it seems to invite one to play a game with it – to begin where one finds oneself, to be swept up in a postmodern gesture that eschews structural and cultural unity.

Cortazar said, “These days, my notion of the fantastic is closer to what we call reality. Perhaps because reality approaches the fantastic more and more.”

Buenos Aires is a fantastic city. I will be returning soon…

 

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By |May 11th, 2014|FindMyAudience|0 Comments

The Opposite of Gravity: D.L. Prophet’s ABNA Pitch

gravity

Our scars create the maps that help us find our way to each other.

At her birthday dinner with her husband, happily married, thirty-something, Nicola (Nicki) Botticelli’s evening ends with divorce papers in her hands and a sucker punch to her heart.

When Nicki’s husband tells her he’s leaving her for the marriage counselor they’ve been seeing to make their good marriage even better, she swan dives into couch surfing, junk food eating despair.

But this isn’t just another sad tale about a woman who’s been left by a cheating man. This story is about what can happen next. Nicki’s devoted girlfriends rally to help her pick up the pieces and she’s soon shimmying her way down the road of no regrets. Nicki begins her life again as a single mom with two kids.

She starts by begging a surly gym owner for a job. He sees something in overweight and out-of-shape Nicki and takes a chance on her. That decision pays off for both of them. She works hard and becomes an in-demand personal trainer. As her life and body shape up, she finds herself fending off the advances of a much younger trainer and realizes that she’s ready to risk her heart for love again.

Nicki’s sea-side New England town is mostly populated with retirees, making her chances of meeting Mr. Right about as likely as her showing up on the beach in a thong bikini. She decides to try online dating. Two potential love interests quickly emerge: Javier, a transplanted, Parisian Romeo and C.J., a curiously familiar younger guy with the hometown advantage. Oh, and Nicki’s ex has been dumped by his fling and he wants to come back home.

Will love trump Nicki’s fears as she comes to understand the meaning of the opposite of gravity?

D. L. (Danielle Lise’) Prophet was the quiet, shy little girl in elementary school who still managed to get in as much trouble as the wild boy in the class. She did this by rarely paying attention. It wasn’t her intention to ignore the noble striving of her teacher to educate her pliable young mind. There just was a whole, much more interesting world residing in her creative mind. She was the class daydreamer. Her perceptive sixth grade teacher recognized the value of her imagination and encouraged her to put that world to paper and that began her love of writing.

She’s been telling stories ever since. She started out writing skits and three act plays for the neighborhood kids to perform during their summer vacations. Years later she went on to hone her story-telling skills during the 80’s, as a singer/songwriter, writing for such bands as the Boston area, award-winning, Feat of Clay. 

She now lives on the inspiring coast of Massachusetts where she’s renovating a home with her boyfriend, Ivan. The Opposite of Gravity is her debut novel. She’s presently working on the sequel to the Opposite of Gravity ~ Flying & Falling.

At Find My Audience, we understand that not all authors are marketers. That being said, growing your social audience can expand your readership and book sales. You don’t have to be a book marketer to find new readers online. We are here to simplify this process for you. Sign up today and connect with potential readers across the globe.

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By |March 19th, 2014|Interviews|0 Comments

Writers And Self-Marketing

paul_2Literary Promotion Has A Long History!

One of the things we’ve been looking at here at Find My Audience is the evolution of literary promotion: how writers “traditionally” get the word out about their work, how that process is changing, and how writers can best adapt. I put the word “traditional” in quotes since there is really no set of canonical best practices that have held over the last few decades (let alone centuries) for a writer to connect with their audience.

But there have always been ways to get the word out, many of them inventive and outrageous (and hardly in keeping with the image of the writer as a housebound field mouse). Almost three years ago, the journalist and writer Tony Perrottet published a great piece in the N.Y. Times on “How Writers Build the Brand”. He put the modern writer’s need for proactive online self-promotion in the context of great literary marketing campaigns throughout history.

paul_1George Simenon Would Do Sit-ups For A Sale!

It’s quite a tale! In the short article, he traces literary self-promotion back to 440 B.C. when Herodotus stood up in the Temple of Zeus during the Olympic Games to plug his Histories; through Walt Whitman, who “notoriously wrote his own anonymous reviews, which would not be out of place today on Amazon;” up to Simenon, Hemingway, and Nabokov.  It’s a great, often hilarious piece, and every working writer should read it. As Tony puts it, “It’s always comforting to be reminded that literary whoring — I mean, self-marketing — has been practiced by the greats.”

In the three years since that article, online outlets and social media have proliferated even more, creating new, highly specialized, channels for authors to engage with. But it is not always clear how best to do so. Writers sense that their ideal readers are out there, but they don’t want to hang themselves above the street in a glass cage (as Simenon did), go on a reality TV show, or subject themselves to breathless play-by-play. And they justifiably don’t want to spam people.

We believe the immediacy of communication through these channels, and their effectiveness when used wisely, will start to overcome the writer’s natural resistance to self-marketing. When messages are targeted to likely readers, an author can be more confident that they are speaking to someone who may have an interest. They will speak more authentically and with greater confidence, and in turn their work will have a better chance of getting a reading.

fma-audienceFind My Audience’s Audience Page

Writers have feelings, ideas, and stories to impart, and we intend for Find My Audience to help them reach those people who will hear them as signal, not noise…. and not as a brazen attention-grab. That may work for something with superficial or titillating effect (throw an ad up in front of as many people as possible and appeal to the lowest common denominator), but it won’t work for a written work, where ideas and expression have been honed to present the authors’ unique voice or message, and need engaged attention.

For many decades, large enterprises and brands have used sophisticated demographic and market analysis to “find their audience.” The connection between a reader and a book is very different from that between a “consumer” and a product. But it does not mean that writers can’t take advantage of tools that help them assess interest.

Are you a writer looking for your readership? What do you think?

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By |February 27th, 2014|EBooks and Advertising, The Writer's Dashboard|0 Comments

Wittgenstein & Book Marketing

wittgenstein3Ludwig Wittgenstein

My propositions serve as elucidations in this way: he who understands me eventually recognises them as nonsensical, when he has used them – as steps – to climb up over them. (He must, so to speak, throw away the ladder after he has climbed up it.) He must overcome these propositions, and then he will see the world aright.

Ludwig Wittgenstein, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus

Writers, perhaps this should be our writerly goal for 2014: to use our words as if they were hammers, chisels, pitching tools, as well as primary material (clay, wood, marble, etc.), to build temporary verbal edifices that lead our readers to new perspectives, new insights, to a glimpse of the nature, and importance of, silence itself. That, of course, was Wittgenstein’s last injunction, Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent.

Silence. To have your reader end in that state. That would be something.

* * *

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Of course to lead our readers to silence (a stunned silence at that!) we must first find them. And that is no easy feat to do in the social media echo chamber.

At first glance, one would think that the larger one’s following (on Twitter, Facebook, etc.) the better positioned one is to find the elusive reader. The presumption is that someone out there must surely be paying attention to my verbal blitzkreigs and, impressed by my pithy tweets, scintillating quotes, and bargain price (99 cents), buy my book. If only it were so easy.

Dan Blank, founder of  We Grow Media, notes that “…most people, whether it’s a brand or an individual, do very little research to really understand their audience. They like it to be as broad as possible instead of narrowing it down. So I always ask authors, “who’s your audience?” and I get these vague answers back…And it really illustrates to me that they haven’t done the research to find out who specifically their audience is.”

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The problem, of course, is one of intention – more precisely, how can you measure someone’s intention to read a work based solely on their use of language (and a multi-faceted, multi-intended language at that)? Think of the difference between the intention (and reception) of a tweet and  a Facebook post. The former encourages a a carney-like atmosphere where everyone is a literary barker; the latter, on the other hand, discourages overt commercialization, a delicious irony of sorts.

* * *

For those of you unfamiliar with Ludwig Wittgenstein, he was, I believe, the only philosopher who was ever responsible for creating, or at least shaping, two different schools of philosophical thought: the Logical-Positivist and the Language School of Philosophy.

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Wittgenstein’s life is the stuff of legend: born into a rich, turn-of-the-century Vienese family; three brothers committed suicide; one brother, Paul, lost his arm in World War I and went on to become famous for his one-arm compositions for piano; stints at Cambridge where he shocked the English with his genius, his teutonic disposition, and his depression; bisexuality; self-imposed exiles to Norway and Ireland where he pondered epistemological problems while walking the coasts; and early death from prostate cancer. Many novels have been written about Wittgenstein and Derek Jarman has done a film. The novelist Frank Tallis does a fine job of depicting the heady atmosphere of early twentieth-century Vienna, should you want  a fictional account of the time.

maze

Wittgenstein’s later work, his work on the nature of language, consists of a series of questions, experiments, sorties that often ended up in a linguistic maze — without a thread to rescue him. What, he asked, are the rules of language? How can we mean what we mean? How does someone understand our intended meaning? Is language similar to a game? Are there many “games” within the language game?

* * *

What we find interesting for our purposes, which is to help writers find their readers, is his concept of family resemblances. This is the idea that “things” thought to be connected by one idea (“one essence”) are, rather, connected by similarities and traits, such as one might find in a family (you and your sister have similar noses and chins, but different eyes).

In his Philosophical Investigations Wittgenstein analyzes games in a number of very famous propositions. Here is a sampling:

And we can go through the many, many other groups of games in the same way; we can see how similarities crop up and disappear.

…And the result of this examination is: we see a complicated network of similarities overlapping and criss-crossing: sometimes overall similarities. I can think of no better expression to characterize these similarities than “family resemblances“; for the various resemblances between members of a family: build, features, colour of eyes, gait, temperament, etc. etc. overlap and criss-cross in the same way. – And I shall say: “games” form a family.

And, we might add, books form a family — as do readers. Some are close, like a brother, sister, mother, father; some are distant relatives. Our job is to ferret out the “overlapping” and “criss-crossing” between the language used to describe “a work” and that used by one’s potential readers. This enables us to construct a “proximal-distal” model, one that measures resemblance to a specific work from closest to most distant. In the process, we are able to make some educated guesses about whether someone is “predisposed” or has a higher degree of probability of reading your work.

resemblance

This is fundamentally different from what Amazon, for example, does with its recommendation engine. Amazon recommends books based on the buying patterns of its customers. This is a great service, one we use all the time, but what we are interested in doing is finding, not books, but readers — your readers. And the way we are doing it is by looking at the language they use on the social web. Game on!

duck

 

At Find My Audience, we understand that not all authors are marketers. That being said, growing your social audience can expand your readership and book sales. You don’t have to be a book marketer to find new readers online. We are here to simplify this process for you. Sign up today and connect with potential readers across the globe.

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Need A Writing Coach? Our Choice Is Lauren Sapala

Lauren 1Lauren Sapala

You’ve been coaching writers for years but made this a full-time business about 8 months ago. How has it been going?
It’s been really fantastic so far. I was a bit nervous because I have traditionally coached people in person, and I was worried that I might lose something of that personal connection if I worked with writers via email or Skype. But that actually hasn’t been the case at all. In fact, I’ve noticed that writers who are more on the introverted side have been seeking me out and I think it’s precisely because the option is now open to them to do things over email. I’m an introvert myself (although because I have very strong people skills I’m often mistaken for an extrovert) so it’s been really wonderful taking on more introverted clients.

Writers seem to be like athletes – they come to you in different shapes and with different talents. How do you customize your coaching based on that?
My first rule for coaching writers is: You are where you are right now, and that is exactly where you are supposed to be. Almost every writer who comes to me is focused on the future. They want to finish their novels, get published, gain more confidence, etc. That sort of drive is excellent when it comes to goal-setting, but it’s essential to accept yourself as an artist in this moment. Maybe you haven’t finished your novel yet, but you’ve shown the stamina to get those few rough chapters down. Maybe you haven’t even started your story, but you’ve got the creative brain churning out ideas. By constantly bringing the artist’s awareness back to the present and the positive as touchstones, I can help writers train themselves in resilience and solid self-esteem.

How do you conduct your writing groups? Do you set goals for the groups?
The writing groups I lead meet and write silently together for one hour. I don’t set concrete goals at the beginning of that hour because it’s not about meeting a certain word count or hitting manuscript milestones. However, I do conduct my groups with an emotional intention. My goal is to trust the writers who show up to write. I trust them to be present and do the work. I also put trust in their hopes for themselves and their dreams of a successful writing life. And the writers who show up respond to that trust almost immediately. Struggling writers are usually struggling with whether or not they have “the right” to call themselves a writer. My function is to really see their creative essence, and to recognize them as writers, along with giving them a time and place where they will be welcomed and encouraged to continue creating.

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You have a great blog. It’s chock full of wonderful advice! How do you determine what you write – do you map out where you want your reader to go, or is it more spontaneous?
It’s totally spontaneous. I either write about about something that I’m currently challenged on, or an idea I’ve come across in something I’m reading that sparks my creative flame. I read a lot of fiction, and also a lot of material on human consciousness, psychology and personalities, and seekers throughout history. I don’t map out where I want my reader to go, but I do craft the emotional tone of each post on my blog to open up the heart. When the heart is open it’s much easier for writers to come away from my blog feeling like they can express themselves with true honesty, which is really the key to brilliant writing.

Dostoevsky has had a great impact on your work. Who do you see as the modern Dostoevsky?
Roberto Bolano is my modern Dostoyevsky. I read his 2666 this past year and it changed the way I thought about my own writing, and what is possible in writing. I really don’t even have the words to describe what an incredible writer he was.

What was the most notable book you’ve read this year?
Prisoner of Love by Jean Genet was a book that completely blew me away this year. It’s a memoir of sorts, about Genet’s time spent in the Palestinian refugee camps in Jordan in the 1970s and his time spent with the Black Panthers in the States. It’s a phenomenal recording of the instability of time and the unreliability of memory.

Do you write fiction every day?
I don’t. I actually write once a week. I’ve tried to push myself harder in the past and it just doesn’t work. I’m a very slow writer, in fact. I think of myself as this big sponge walking around, collecting all sorts of stuff and soaking up the world, and then once a week I wring myself out on the page and see what floats to the surface.

How do you set the stage for your writing practice (by editing, pacing, chewing fingernails, etc.)?
I treat it the same way as balancing my checkbook. I just sit down and make myself do it. There’s nothing romantic about it for me, it’s pure work. Work that I’m very grateful for and that I love after the fact, but work all the same. It’s like doing sit-ups. I’m not having so much fun when I’m in the middle of it, but I’m willing to put in the time to get the results.

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You are based in San Francisco. How does “place” affect your writing practice?
When I moved here ten years ago I felt like I had finally come home. San Francisco is filled with eccentrics, artists, weirdos and people who just want to walk around in the streets naked. It’s also filled with ambition, innovation, and business mavericks. I love all of these things. I had been searching for a mix of exactly these things all of my life. Every picture I use on my blog is a picture I took just walking around the city, looking at stuff. I walk around San Francisco a lot and I can never get enough of it.

Do you have any writing goals for this year?
My goal is to finish the novel I’m currently working on and start another. That’s my goal every year and I do usually hit it.

How do people get in touch with you? What are your fees? Do you just work with novelists, or also with screenwriters, non-fiction writers, poets, etc.?
People usually contact me through my website, although I am also extremely active on Twitter. I work with all types of writers, but if I don’t think it’s going to be great fit, I usually know someone I can recommend for what they’re looking for. Fees vary widely. It really depends on what the writer needs and wants. Some writers are only looking for help editing a finished manuscript, while others really want to dig in and work on themselves as part of the process. I do a free consultation to determine what would be most helpful and the scope of the work.

writing

 

At Find My Audience, we understand that not all authors are marketers. That being said, growing your social audience can expand your readership and book sales. You don’t have to be a book marketer to find new readers online. We are here to simplify this process for you. Sign up today and connect with potential readers across the globe.

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By |January 4th, 2014|Interviews|0 Comments

The Writer’s DashBoard: What We Are Working On Today

social_network_2

 

Our “problem” of the day has to do with Social Network Interfaces

The Challenge:  Find the most effective entry-points into the social web for our purposes.

Our Focus: We continue to investigate various means to interact with social networks like Twitter, Facebook, Goodreads, “the blogosphere,” and other social channels.

social_network_1

Programmatic interfaces (known as APIs) provide visibility into the public content available on many of these networks and several third-party systems aggregate feeds across multiple channels.  Our engineers have been weighing the pros of cons of various approaches.  Many of the third party tools do an excellent job of normalizing information coming from different sources and supplementing the raw content with their own analytic overlays.  Alternately, building our own adapters into the social networks puts us in more direct control of the data flow, which may yield benefits down the line when we start applying our relevance algorithms.

Within the broader tech community, there’s a tremendous amount of activity going on in this area, much of it by companies focused on social media monitoring tools for businesses.  While we are not squarely in that space, the rapid advance of tools to support business intelligence applications around social data is working to our advantage, providing us with many viable options to tap into the social web and, ultimately, to help our users distinguish the signal within the noise.

It’s an exciting arena to be working in right now!

At Find My Audience, we understand that not all authors are marketers. That being said, growing your social audience can expand your readership and book sales. You don’t have to be a book marketer to find new readers online. We are here to simplify this process for you. Sign up today and connect with potential readers across the globe.

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Writing Crime Fiction? Turn to Micki Browning for Help

Micki 49 - Headshot

Micki Browning

Hi Micki, can you tell us a little about yourself?
I recently concluded a twenty-two year career in law enforcement that started in California as a patrol officer and ended in Colorado as a commander. During my career, I served as a hostage negotiator, led the Detective Bureau, managed Records, the Property & Evidence Bureau, Training, and Internal Affairs. I trained as a SWAT commander, and served as an agency Public Information Officer. Now, I split my time hiking in the Colorado Rockies and scuba diving off the Florida Keys.

You have a fascinating background, one that includes a stint with The FBI National Academy. How has that influenced your choice of genre and subject matter for your books?
We’ve all heard the adage that authors should write what they know. After 22 years of being a cop, I know the culture inside and out. I also know that nothing is black and white. Criminals do things for a variety of reasons — not all of which are nefarious. One of my favorite stories is Victor Hugo’s Les Miserables. It explores issues of blind justice and redemption. Jean Valjean is an ex-convict, Inspector Javert a dedicated law officer. Both have secrets, both have good intentions. The story challenges assumptions. Crime sets the stage, but the story is ultimately about people. As a cop, I’ve seen amazing and horrible things. These experiences color everything I write. Of course, having Sue Grafton attend the Citizens’ Police Academy I coordinated was also inspirational!

You offer consulting to writers who are writing about crime and want to get the details correct. What does a typical consult consist of? 
I’ve discovered there is no such thing as a typical consult. People are at different stages in their manuscript. Writers may have a simple question about protocol.  Sometimes, an author will describe a scenario and want to know if A leads to B, will (or can) C happen?  Others have written multiple chapters that they’d like me to review for authenticity and technical oversight. Ultimately, I offer suggestions to ensure accuracy and increase the author’s credibility.

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Quite frankly, it’s often unexpected details that trip up crime writers.  For example, I just critiqued a scene where a teenager looks back at a car that’s following her and sees a New Mexico license plate. The problem? New Mexico only issues a single plate and it’s affixed to the back of the car. Or one author wanted to arm her protagonist with a sawed-off shotgun. She didn’t realize that possession of this type of modified weapon is a felony and thus turned her law-abiding heroine into a felon.

Fortunately, it often only takes a few tweaks to turn a glaring mistake into a realistic scenario.

You have a BA in Medieval Studies. How has that impacted your own writing?
I obtained my degree while working full time. I knew the degree wouldn’t have a direct impact on my job, but the classes fascinated me. In the process, I learned time management skills and the importance of research. Every story or article requires research. The trick is deciding what details to include overtly, what to layer in discretely, and what facts should be quietly forgotten. Now that I’m “retired,” structuring my time has become even more critical.

Perhaps someday I’ll be able to use my knowledge to pen a mystery series as engaging as Ellis Peters’ Brother Cadfael!

Can you tell us a little about your books and what writing you are doing now?
Up until lately, my writing was predominately nonfiction. I’ve written for magazines, newspapers and textbooks. Since retiring from law enforcement, I’ve shifted to fiction. Like many of the authors I help, I’m currently in the query process–and doing my best to develop patience. In the meantime, I’ve received recognition for several short pieces I’ve submitted to contests, and I’m hard at work on my next crime novel.

Thrillers, detective series, espionage — these genres (most of which revolve around a crime) are attracting some of the best writers today. What do you attribute that to?
Regardless of genre, the best writers have always spun tales that illuminate the human condition with great specificity. I find that the most engaging crime fiction lingers not on the crime itself, but rather its impact. How does if affect a person individually? How does it ripple through a community? Jodi Picoult and Dennis Lehane are masters at detailing the repercussions that reverberate through lives.

Do you see a difference in approach to a crime novel by authors from different nationalities?
Funny you should ask this question.  The more I travel, the more I’m convinced that people are people are people. Yes, there are cultural differences, but ultimately, we all love, we all have regrets, we all dream, we all feel violated by crime. So while there may be stylistic differences in the execution, the germ of the story originates from the same wellspring.

If a writer would like to get in touch with you for a consultation, what should they do?
It all starts with an email, micki@literarypartnersincrime. For Contact directions, please visit http://literarypartnersincrime.com/contact.htm. Once I know what an author needs, together we’ll devise a plan to achieve it.

At Find My Audience, we understand that not all authors are marketers. That being said, growing your social audience can expand your readership and book sales. You don’t have to be a book marketer to find new readers online. We are here to simplify this process for you. Sign up today and connect with potential readers across the globe.

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By |December 28th, 2013|Interviews|0 Comments

Book Covers from Crew: American Spring

We are hard at work developing The Writers’ Dashboard, the first audience detection tool for writers. But it doesn’t mean that we aren’t still honing the craft that inspired us in the first place — that is to say, writing. Below are two covers from Mark’s soon-to-be-released YA novel, Crew: American Spring. This is quite a departure from his earlier work, The Book of Margery Kempe. Let us know which cover you like best. The covers were done by Thomas Mims from Hawk&Moon.
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By |November 29th, 2012|Uncategorized|0 Comments

The Trailer for The Book of Margery Kempe

This trailer was done by Mr. Thomas Mims, digital artist extraordinaire. Thomas excels in book covers, trailers, blogs, web sites, cards, and much more! Check out his work at www.hawkandmoon.com.
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By |August 29th, 2012|The Book of Margery Kempe|0 Comments

Springtime at Honey Bee Farm

Back in Winter I did a post on Snow Day at Honey Bee Farm. Well, here’s one of Springtime at Honey Bee Farm. Take a look and let me know what you think. Honey, salves, and tinctures coming soon!

Bee Hives out near the Barn 

Nettle

Culinary Sage

Lovage

At Find My Audience, we understand that not all authors are marketers. That being said, growing your social audience can expand your readership and book sales. You don’t have to be a book marketer to find new readers online. We are here to simplify this process for you. Sign up today and connect with potential readers across the globe.

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By |June 28th, 2012|Uncategorized|0 Comments